Jinrikisha – Japanese wonderful vehicle- 素敵な日本の乗り物 ー人力車ー 

Hello everybody. みなさん、こんにちは!
 

Today I’d like to introduce you to Jinrikisha.

今日は、人力車を紹介したいと思います。

 

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(source http://www.ebisuya.com/)
 
 
 
 
 
 
浅草人力車❖西下町コース❖えびす屋 雷門店【日本通TV】
Jinrikisha at Asakusa
 

How do you like it?

どう?(^▽^)

It looks like fun.

楽しそうね〜。

I’ve never ridden a Jinrikisha yet.
私は、まだ人力車に乗ったことがないんです。

I want to try to ride that!!
乗ってみたいな〜
Jinrikisha 人力車
Starting in 1870, the Tokyo government issued a permit to build and sell 人力車 (jinrikisha : rickshaws in Japanese) to the trio that are believed in Asia to be the rickshaw’s inventors: Izumi Yosuke, Takayama Kosuke, and Suzuki Tokujiro. In order to operate a rickshaw in Tokyo, a seal was required from these men. By 1872, they replaced the palanquins and became the main mode of transportation in Japan, with about 40,000 rickshaws in service. At that time man-power was much cheaper than horse-power; horses were generally only used by the military. Some of the rickshaws were artistically decorated with paintings and rear elevations. In this time, the more exuberant styles of decorations were banned. If the families were well-off financially they might have their own rickshaw runner. Generally, runners covered 32 to 48 kilometres (20 to 30 mi) in a day, at an average traveling speed of 8 kilometres (5.0 mi) per hour.
Japanese rickshaw manufacturers produced and exported rickshaws to Asian countries and South Africa.
(Wikipedia)
 
 
 
See you じゃあね、また!